About Me

Hello. I started this blog to write about what I do in my chosen profession : a housewife. Some day I might cook or bake something interesting and enlist my 2 year old to help, on another day I make something from scratch instead of buying it from the store and sometimes I craft with my daughter. Once in a while, we travel or have a fun day outside. I am also doing what I can to recycle and reduce waste. I am still learning all of this and documenting my journey through this blog

Lauki ke gatte ki sabzi - Steamed bottlegourd besan dumplings in yogurt gravy

I am always looking for new ways to make the humble and healthy lauki (bottlegourd). It is not a vegetable most people look forward to eating. Lauki chane ki dal is the usual way it is made in our house, which is an acceptable way for the picky eaters in the house. I was looking for something more exciting to add variety to our lauki eating habits. I came across this member contributed recipe on tarla dalal website.
This recipe completely disguises the lauki and makes a pretty looking and pretty tasting dish. It will not evoke any of the boring expressions which usually accompany a regular lauki ki sabzi.

Bottlegourd gatte in yogurt gravy

Grated bottlegourd is kneaded into a dough and steamed to make the gatte which are then lightly toasted on a pan before adding to a light yogurt gravy. These go perfectly with some rotis. I used this recipe from tarla dalal website with a few changes.

Lauki Bottlegourd Gatte ki sabzi


Ingredients:
For Gatte:
1 medium bottlegourd
1 cup besan
3/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp turmeric powder
1 heaping tsp coriander-cumin powder
1/4 tsp chilli powder
For Gravy:
1 1/2 cups yogurt
1 tsp oil
1/2 tsp cumin seeds
2 cloves
1 inch piece cinnamon
1 heaping tsp ginger-garlic paste
1/2 medium onion
1/8 tsp asafoetida
1/4 tsp turmeric
1 dry red chilli
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp sugar
  • Grate the bottlegourd and squeeze excess water from it. Add the spices and besan and mix till a dough forms. There is no need to knead like a chapati dough. The dough will be slightly sticky. Apply some oil to your hands if you find it difficult to work with the dough.
  • Divide into 3 or 4 portions. Roll each portion between your hands to make a thick rope.
  • Bring some water to a boil in a saucepan over which a colander will fit properly. The water should not touch the bottom of the colander. If you have a steamer, this is the time to use it instead of this make-shift steamer.
  • Once the water boils, grease the colander well with oil and place the ropes in it. Cover and cook over medium flame for about 12 mins. The gatte would have changed color and look dry.
  • Remove the gatte ropes from the colander and let cool. The bottom of the ropes might look wet if the water was boiling too wildly but it will dry out once the ropes cool down.
  • Once cool, cut into 1/2 inch wide circles. Heat a pan/tawa and spray lightly with oil. Once hot, sear the circles lightly on both sides and keep aside.
  • For the gravy, heat 1 tsp oil in a pan and add cumin seeds, asafoetida, cloves, cinnamon and dry red chilli.
  • Add the ginger-garlic paste and finely chopped onion. Saute till the onion gets soft and ginger-garlic paste is cooked.
  • Add the turmeric and mix.
  • Add the yogurt, salt and sugar. Add enough water to make a gravy consistency to your liking. Mine wasn't too thick but not too thin either.
  • Heat on medium flame till it almost come to a boil. Add the gatte in the last 5 minutes of cooking the gravy.
  • Add chopped coriander leaves on top (really adds to the flavor) and serve with chapatis/rotis.
Notes:
Dont worry too much about making a smooth dough for the gatte. The dough is slightly sticky and the gatte will be softer and better with this dough consistency.